Tag Archives: fake people on YouTube

Begging And Other Ploys On YouTube

I am going to write this blog post about YouTube Channels, in the order of least annoying to most annoying.

When I watch metal detecting and abandoned places exploration videos on YouTube, I don’t recall ever being asked for money.  The metal detecting people very much enjoy everything about what they are doing, traveling to new places, exploring new places, detecting buried objects, and digging up objects to see what they are.

The abandoned places exploration videos, those people get pretty excited, and are happy in what they are doing too.  Now that I think about it, the exploration people usually ask for people to subscribe to their YouTube channel at the end of their videos.

When a YouTube channel gains a certain number of subscribers, and YouTube can see how many people are visiting a YouTube channel, YouTube has a formula that they use to determine how much money they will pay to a YouTube channel owner, based on how much paid advertising that they can place on that channel.

Look at it this way, when a particular person consistently uploads videos to their YouTube channel, and their videos usually receive 30,000 views, that person might as well be producing a daily or weekly television show, with that many views.  When these 30,000 viewers are drawn to a particular person’s videos, yes YouTube should pay the video creator a portion of the advertising revenue, and YouTube does.

The RV Life, Travel Trailer Life, Van Life people, who began making YouTube videos ten years ago, gained enough subscribers to their YouTube channels, maybe 30,000 to 100,000 subscribers, plus they had consistently very high views to their videos, that some of them eventually began getting paid $500 to $5,000 per month by YouTube, based on YouTube’s pay formula.

I don’t see anything wrong with this.  The RV Life, Travel Trailer Life, and Van Life people did not want to be tied down to one spot by having a normal job, so making videos of what they were doing, travelling from place to place, gave YouTube viewers something that they wanted to see and learn about, and in turn YouTube paid the video creators, which allowed them to continue to live out on the road.

However, there became a problem, which I believe that I wrote about not too long ago in a blog post titled something like “Fake People On YouTube”.  The real RV Life, Travel Trailer Life, and Van Life people that claimed to be living in their camper, were living in their camper, and they were making a video for YouTube about once every two or three days.

The fake RV Life, Travel Trailer Life, and Van Life people, practically held a casting call for young ladies that looked good in a bikini, and for cute looking dogs.  They obtained some props, like a camper, van, surfboards, or kayaks, got some wardrobe, and developed a shooting schedule with locations.  They went out on the road, they filmed at about ten locations per day, stayed in a hotel every night, until their shooting schedule was completed after about ten days.

The fake RV Life, Travel Trailer Life, and Van Life people, would film at enough locations in ten days, to have enough material for perhaps 50 to 80 videos.  Then, they could release two of these videos per week, for the next six months, to their YouTube RV Life channel, without ever having spent even a single night in an RV.

The fake RV Life people were called out on this, when the real RV Life people began pointing out that the fake people didn’t even have any food, water, utensils, or bedding in their RVs.

I am mentioning the fake RV Life, Travel Trailer Life, and Van Life people again,  because some YouTube viewers have pointed out, that these people tend to begin sharing all of their difficulties on the road, which leads up to them asking for money from viewers.

What I have noticed, is that just about all of the female campers, whether they are alone or with a man, end up sharing their problems on the road, and their YouTube videos begin to amount to thinly veiled begging and fund drives.

Finally, I am getting to what are now the most annoying YouTube videos to me.  These are the alternative lifestyle videos.  Typically, these alternative lifestyle videos involve people who do not have a job, but they seek to enjoy a good lifestyle, which often includes travel.

There are so many tangents that I could go off on complaining about the alternative lifestyle videos on YouTube, that I will try to stick to just one subject, employment.  These people who make YouTube videos and do not have a job, are living in their car, or are staying with friends or family, I can tell from watching them, that they could get a job as a waiter, waitress, at Home Depot, or a car wash.

Yes, they would have to put on and wear shoes at work, they might be required to shove their dread locks up under a hat or scarf, they would have to show up to work on time, and stay at work until the end of their shift, but I think that they could do it, just like everyone else has to.

The alternative lifestyle people see themselves as too sensitive, too creative, too intelligent for ordinary work, and they are trying to find work that is meaningful to them, or a lifestyle that suits them.  They create a YouTube channel, and they begin uploading videos, hoping to gain enough subscribers and enough video views, to begin receiving monthly payments from YouTube.

More and more young people are creating a YouTube channel, hoping to gain thousands of subscribers, thousands of views to their videos, and eventually receive monthly payments from YouTube.

In order to set themselves apart from other people on YouTube, to gain extra sympathy and extra attention, they begin making videos about their ADHD, their depression, their bi-polar disorder, their schizophrenia, their homelessness, their step brother trying to have sex with them, their step father trying to have sex with them, their teacher trying to have sex with them, them coming out of the closet as a lesbian, or why they like to have sex with their dog.

With about 320 million people in the United States, it is not going to pay for much longer, when you have about 20 million Americans with a YouTube channel, trying to make shit up on YouTube to gain sympathy and subscribers.

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